Discover Transylvania

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Discover Transylvania

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Discover Transylvania

On the majestic backdrop of the Carpathians, at the end of a road that winds through an ancient forest, the picturesque village of Cund, with its vividly painted houses, shines like a hidden jewel. Over the centuries, it soaked up German, Romanian and Hungarian traditions - and the result is a fascinating fusion of cultures, apparent in the architecture of the traditional houses or in the Saxon vibe of St. Nicholas Church.

If you like nature cruises, in spring you will have wild daffodils and orchids for company, in summer kestrels will be orbiting the piercing blue skies, in fall you can go on truffle expeditions, and in winter the snow-capped hills and mountains are perfect for adventure. The surroundings, about 100 km from the village, are also rich in natural beauty and cultural highlights (fortified cities, folk museums etc.).
Books
Indoor activities
Valea Verde Restaurant

A bit of history

1141
1332
1500
1906
1918
1945
1994
2013
1141

The colonisation of Transylvania by the Germans is begun by King Géza II of Hungary (1141–1162). For decades, the main task of  the German settlers is to grow the economy the South-Eastern border of the Kingdom of Hungary. The colonisation continues until the end of the 13th century.

1332

First records of the Saxon settlement „Reussdorf“ (the German name for Cund).

1500

St. Nicholas Church in Cund is built in the 15th century.

1906

The hand-painted coffered ceiling of St. Nicholas Church, an element which can be found in many Saxon churches in Transylvania, is substituted by a simple ceiling.

1918

After the Treaty of Trianon, Transylvania becomes part of Romania. The Saxons, together with other German-speaking groups, become part of the German minority.

1945

The Transylvanian Saxon population decreases dramatically after World War II. The process of out-migration continues during Communist rule in Romania, and the great majority of Transylvanian Saxons now live in Germany. Very few still live in Romania - 6 000 registered at the last official census.

1994

In Cund, the majority of the remaining Saxons leave for Germany between 1990 and 1994. Of the 200 Saxons in 1994, only 3 are still living here, of the once proud population of over 700.

2013

The restoration of St. Nicholas church starts with the help of Karin and Klaus Schäfer and the support of generous donors from Germany. In 2019, major works will continue due to the help of some new enthusiastic supporters - work in progress.